The Birth of Patriotism

Our precious freedom brings with it the obligations to serve one another, thus preserving our freedom

We don’t think of ourselves as a third world country.

Today we are a powerful nation, with a heritage and a capable military. We are vastly removed from a time when our borders were fluid boundaries shared by other governments with interests here. We do not live under the thumb of a mother colony or nation like England.

To the British they must have seen us as an outpost.

They had been to war with us decades before the revolution during the French Indian War.  They had witnessed what they thought was an incompetent commander in the likes of George Washington, fumble his way through his tour. The idea that this was now our supreme commander must have made the British laugh.

This fact, on top of the fact that we had no official military or Navy must have made them think they would make short work of our rebellion. We had never organized into expeditionary units that could challenge another nation, so challenging a nation as powerful as this one probably looked like suicide. Additionally, limited industry and some significant cultural differences between Northern and Southern colonies, including distance, made the idea of the British not winning, seem ridiculous.

Yes we had a huge population.

Yes we had the advantage of home terrain, but let us put this in perspective. The British would eventually conquer a huge part of the world with nations whose populations far outpaced those on her mainland as in the case of countries like China, Canada, Australia. So in this context, thirteen coastal colonies declaring their independence probably seemed outrageously stupid to the British High Command. There was only one huge fatal flaw in their thinking. We did have a will to win. It may have been buried deep inside a part of the colonies, but its dormancy would end when the British invaded.

That will to be independent came in the form of Patriotism.

This is the same Patriotism that sometimes seems dormant in our land of many cultures and interests. It re-emerges at time of need. You see it manifest during the Revolutionary war, the Civil war, the World Wars, and of course our trouble in the Middle East

It is part of who we are.

The Patriotism ignited on the battlefields of the Revolutionary war  challenged an empire. This same English empire had no trouble repressing the people of South Africa, India, China, Canada and others. We stand different. We took our freedom from the most feared military in the world. This to me is true Patriotism. This rising above the third world mentality that we are to be controlled, and taking control is a huge piece of our national identity. It is at the deepest core of our values, though you may not always see it. This Patriotism has molded us into a great nation and changed the world.

 

Many thanks for the contribution of this article

by my friend  Michael

  • James

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